WOMEN AREN'T HAVING A MOMENT


Here’s a challenge to all people who write press blurbs or introductions to interviews you’ve done with me - because both men and women do this —– you don’t have to put me in context with other women who do comedy right now. You don’t have to mention feminism or that I am a woman. Doing standup is already evidently a feminist thing for a woman to do. Enough already. Nobody writes an article about guys I know and then lists other guys (guys who are nothing like him by the way) and write “Guys are having a moment right now - maybe it’s This Guy’s turn.” Whatever moment another woman is having or women in general has nothing to do with me. I’m a comedian. I’m Jen. I’m not a sociological experiment. I’m not your thesis. I’ve been around for 18 years doing this and as far as I can see getting on stage is always an important moment whether it’s my first open mic or my 2,000th paid gig. Don’t create weird narratives about what women are having what moments. Just write a fucking article that helps to reveal another side of a comedian people know or make me seem interesting to people who don’t know me. I’m just trying to sell tickets here and nothing is less funny to a reader than what should be your grad school paper not a tease to an article about a funny person. Not every article has to rank me in some context of where women in comedy are going, have gone, blah blah. I’m a comic. I’ve never seen myself as a woman in comedy. I’m a woman because that’s the gender I was born into. I’m a comedian because that’s who I am. When you think it’s powerful to harp on gender you’re pointing out your limitations and making them seem like mine. Simply existing in the world and doing what the fuck I want is feminist - whether I am a man or woman. Equality won’t happen until we start just ignoring gender when we write about comedians. If the comedian talks gender in their act or shows - great. Let that speak for itself. Otherwise you’re just whittling someone down to a “moment” that you think an entire gender is having and honestly - that’s just too small of a thought for me.

Here’s a challenge to all people who write press blurbs or introductions to interviews you’ve done with me - because both men and women do this —– you don’t have to put me in context with other women who do comedy right now. You don’t have to mention feminism or that I am a woman. Doing standup is already evidently a feminist thing for a woman to do. Enough already. Nobody writes an article about guys I know and then lists other guys (guys who are nothing like him by the way) and write “Guys are having a moment right now - maybe it’s This Guy’s turn.” Whatever moment another woman is having or women in general has nothing to do with me. I’m a comedian. I’m Jen. I’m not a sociological experiment. I’m not your thesis. I’ve been around for 18 years doing this and as far as I can see getting on stage is always an important moment whether it’s my first open mic or my 2,000th paid gig. Don’t create weird narratives about what women are having what moments. Just write a fucking article that helps to reveal another side of a comedian people know or make me seem interesting to people who don’t know me. I’m just trying to sell tickets here and nothing is less funny to a reader than what should be your grad school paper not a tease to an article about a funny person. Not every article has to rank me in some context of where women in comedy are going, have gone, blah blah. I’m a comic. I’ve never seen myself as a woman in comedy. I’m a woman because that’s the gender I was born into. I’m a comedian because that’s who I am. When you think it’s powerful to harp on gender you’re pointing out your limitations and making them seem like mine. Simply existing in the world and doing what the fuck I want is feminist - whether I am a man or woman. Equality won’t happen until we start just ignoring gender when we write about comedians. If the comedian talks gender in their act or shows - great. Let that speak for itself. Otherwise you’re just whittling someone down to a “moment” that you think an entire gender is having and honestly - that’s just too small of a thought for me.